Engaging Your Older Donors

engage

Your list of top prospects almost certainly includes a number of donors who are of retirement age.  And it’s a foregone conclusion that you should have a detailed plan for each person to ask them for their annual gift, a major multi-year gift, and a legacy gift.  But we also know that retired people can lose the feeling of being engaged, vital, and active.  Most likely their phone has stopped ringing, the invitations have declined, and interest in their professional accomplishments has waned.

Here are a few ideas about strategies to meaningfully engage your older prospects:

  • Ask for their time, and give them your time. Seniors have more time than working people.  Plan on spending time with them.  Invite them to lunch or to dinner.  Invite their spouse too, as appropriate.
  • Give them your attention. Listen to their ideas about your organization.  Invite them to tell their story about their professional life and their involvement with your charity.  Find out as much as you can about their commitment, their passion, and their priorities for your organization.
  • Consider them for an active role. Feel them out for an advisory board, a committee, or a short-term project task force.  Remember that they are retired, not dead!  Let them know that you need their support and engage them in a conversation about what that might look like.  This kind of engagement is especially meaningful if you can draw on the expertise they earned in their professional life, such as asking a retired lawyer to serve on your planned giving advisory council.
  • Ask them to connect you with others. Their contacts can be of value to your charity.  Think about whether it might be right to ask them to host an event at their home or their club, and use the occasion to broaden your network of support.  Donors with a home in Florida or Arizona might open their home to your organization in the winter months!  Bring your CEO and get on a plane to tell your story to a new population, and enjoy time with your senior prospects in their happy place.
  • Pay special attention to how your thank them. Thank your retired donors in multiple ways.  Send a handwritten note; send flowers or appropriate gift.  Call them and talk about what a nice time you had when you got together.  Share some photos if you have them.

Give your senior prospects special attention.  You’ll enjoy it as much as they will, and your charity will benefit in ways you cannot imagine.

by: Steven Murphy, Ed.D., Senior Advisor, HUB Philanthropic Solutions

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